Cheery Friday e-mails

Every Friday I send a “Cheery Friday” email chock full of insights about learning and changing to a million registered learners from the massive open online course (“MOOC”) Learning How to Learn.  To receive these emails, just register for the course here (it’s free, and registration takes only a few seconds).  “See” you on Friday!

iDoRecall

Cheery Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! A new video on Learning How to Learn! Barb has just made a new video for Learning How to Learners on how to easily create flashcards for retrieval practice while you are in Learning How to Learn—or in any Coursera course.  Check the video out here. (You may need to reset the deadlines for Lea …

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After the Romanovs – Red Notice

Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! This week, we will digress to discuss how important learning is when it comes to international politics and war.  Let us begin with the book After the Romanovs: Russian Exiles in Paris from the Belle Époque Through Revolution and War by Helen Rappaport. As Barb was learning Russian back in the 1970s …

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The Brain in Search of Itself

Cheery Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! Book of the Month The Brain in Search of Itself: Santiago Ramón y Cajal and the Story of the Neuron, by Benjamin Ehrlich.  What a magnificent book!  Longtime fans of Learning How to Learn know that we’re in turn longtime fans of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the father of modern neuroscience.  As a …

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Journey of the Mind

Cheery Friday Greetings (from Bucharest!) to our Learning How to Learners! Book of the Month Journey of the Mind: How Thinking Emerged from Chaos, by Ogi Ogas and Sai Gaddam. This engrossing book provides a step-by-step understanding of how consciousness, language, self-awareness, and civilization itself arose. What’s unique about this book is its …

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The Girl Who Ran

Cheery Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! Book of the Week (special for kids!) The Girl Who Ran: Bobbi Gibb, the First Woman to Run the Boston Marathon, by Kristina Yee and Frances Poletti, illustrated by Susanna Chapman. Bobbi Gibb was the first woman to—despite staunch opposition—run the Boston Marathon.  (We still remember the new …

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The Bottomless Well

Cheery Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! Book of the Week The Bottomless Well: The Twilight of Fuel, the Virtue of Waste, and Why We Will Never Run Out of Energy by Peter W Huber, Mark P. Mills.  This book is considered a classic on energy, lauded by everyone from Bill Gates to, well, the best economist we know in energy studies, Ga …

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Cracks in the Ivory Tower

Cheery Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! Book of the Week Cracks in the Ivory Tower: The Moral Mess of Higher Education, by Jason Brennan and Phillip Magness.  This fascinating book is framed around an important premise – it’s not that people in a given problematic institution, say, academia, are necessarily bad people.  It is inste …

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Raising Critical Thinkers

Cheery Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! Book of the Month Raising Critical Thinkers: A Parent’s Guide to Growing Wise Kids in the Digital Age, by Julie Bogart.  As one endorser notes: “Julie Bogart is a brilliant educator who’s written a wonderful book that shows us how to nurture children’s ability to think critically and carefull …

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Icebound

Cheery Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! Heads up—as Barb is heading into heavy work on the final two MOOCs of the Uncommon Sense Teaching specialization, and another exciting three-MOOC specialization to be announced, we will be moving to a “once a month” schedule, (along with occasional bonus emails), for our Cheery Friday email.  …

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Lifespan: Why We Age—and Why We Don’t Have To

Cheery Friday Greetings to our Learning How to Learners! Book of the Week Lifespan: Why We Age—and Why We Don’t Have To, by David Sinclair with Matthew D. LaPlante. [Hat tip, Adam Trybus] This fascinating, beautifully written book explores a common—but ignored—factor in many lethal diseases.  That is, the effects of aging.  Sinclair describes why a …

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